Defending the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument Expansion

President Clinton designated the Klamath-Siskiyou National Monument in 2000. It is the first and only national monument specifically established to protect biological diversity. But ecologists agreed after the designation that many of the most important parts of the region were excluded from the monument’s boundaries. In 2015, 85 scientists concerned about increasing threats to the area signed a letter urging monument expansion in to better protect and connect important habitats for the monument’s spectacular variety of plants and animals “whose survival in the region,” according the monument’s original proclamation, “depends upon its continued ecological integrity.” In January 2017, President Obama expanded the monument to include these ecologically important areas.

Soon after, a timber company and the Association of O&C Counties, keen on logging, filed separate lawsuits suggesting an obscure law requires the area be logged and supersedes the Antiquities Act, used to designate and expand the monument. They’re wrong, and we’re representing the Soda Mountain Wilderness Council, Klamath-Siskiyou Wild, Oregon Wild, and the Wilderness Society, defending the monument from this industry attack. These lawsuits are stayed (paused) until the Trump administration completes its review and implements any changes to national monuments.

If we must protect this jewel of the Pacific Northwest from the president of the United States, we’re prepared to do so.

Project Updates

Coalition Defends Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

Late last Friday, local and partner conservation groups intervened in two lawsuits to protect the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument from challenges brought by timber interests. The Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument is one of the most biodiverse places in North...